Socrates tames a Grey

“They eat us” Thea ete tus

I propose the theory is hidden until you read the text from a man trying to reason with a robot like intelligence (grey)whose role it is, is to makes creatures in incubators for a master race. Theaetetus is the midwife creature in the story, the lab assistant. An animated body, a time plane worker, a droid.
The play is written from the basis that Theaetetus was quite a young man. This dialogue is then read aloud to the two men by a slave boy in the employ of Euclides.  Theaetetus, is a young Socrates look-alike, rather homely, with a snub-nose and protruding eyes. (grey)


The two older men spot Theaetetus rubbing himself down with oil, and Theodorus reviews the facts about him, that he is intelligent, virile, and an orphan whose inheritance has been squandered by trustees.

Socrates tells Theaetetus that he cannot make out what knowledge is, and is looking for a simple formula for it. Theaetetus says he really has no idea how to answer the question, and Socrates tells him that he is there to help. Socrates says he has modelled his career after his midwife mother. She delivered babies and for his part, Socrates can tell when a young man is in the throes of trying to give birth to a thought.


In Plato’s Theaetetus (150a), Socrates compares himself to a true matchmaker (προμνηστικός promnestikós), as distinguished from a panderer (προᾰγωγός proagogos). This distinction is echoed in Xenophon’s Symposium (3.20), when Socrates jokes about his certainty of being able to make a fortune, if he chose to practice the art of pandering. For his part as a philosophical interlocutor, he leads his respondent to a clearer conception of wisdom, although he claims he is not himself a teacher (Apology). His role, he claims, is more properly to be understood as analogous to a midwife (μαῖα maia). Socrates explains that he is himself barren of theories, but knows how to bring the theories of others to birth and determine whether they are worthy or mere “wind eggs” (ἀνεμιαῖον anemiaion). Perhaps significantly, he points out that midwives are barren due to age, and women who have never given birth are unable to become midwives; they would have no experience or knowledge of birth and would be unable to separate the worthy infants from those that should be left on the hillside to be exposed. To judge this, the midwife must have experience and knowledge of what she is judging.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theaetetus_(dialogue)


 

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